About this site

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

Banning of certain persons associated with the Congress Movement

At the A.N.C. conference in May, Mr. Ronald Segal, who is editor of the periodical Africa South, publicly applied for membership of this Congress. On his return to Cape Town he became one of the targets of Cape Town's alleged Klu Klux Klan. Anonymous telephone callers threatened him, and someone set fire to his car by exploding a "petrol-bomb" underneath it. This was a new and disturbing development: it was the first time since the War that violence had been used as a method of political intimidation.

Mr. Segal applied for a firearm licence, but was refused this. Shortly afterwards, when he was allegedly distributing pamphlets advertising the boycott of certain firms and brands of goods, he was arrested and found guilty of entering Nyanga African Township without a permit and of being in possession of an unlicensed firearm. Just over a month later, he was banned from attending public gatherings for five years.

Mr. Peter Bcylcvcld, the national president of the Congress of Democrats, and the late Mr. Lionel Forman, who was editor of New Age and was the advocate who defended Mr. Segal in court, were also ordered to refrain for five years from attending public meetings.

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.