About this site

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

Moseneke, Dikgang Ernest

Click here for list of interviews

Moseneke was born in 1947 in Pretoria.

At the age of 15 he was arrested, detained and convicted for participating in political activities as a member of the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC). He spent ten years on Robben Island during which time he matriculated and obtained a BA (English & Political Science) and a Bjuris through Unisa. He subsequently completed an LLB, also through Unisa.

He was the first black advocate to be admitted to the Pretoria Bar. He first took silk in 1993. He served on the technical committee which drafted the 1993 interim constitution. In 1994 he was appointed deputy chairman of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). In September 1994 he was appointed to the Supreme Court as an acting judge.

He is a founder member of the Black Lawyers Association and of the National Association of Democratic Lawyers of South Africa and has served several community-based and non-governmental organisations, including being Chairman of Project Literacy for more than ten years, trustee of Sowetan Nation Building, and deputy chairman of the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund. He is the first chancellor of the Pretoria Technikon.

In 2004 he was appointed chairperson of the independent commission for the remuneration of political office-bearers.

From 1995 to 2001 he was chief executive of New Africa Investments and chairman of, among others, Telkom South Africa, African Merchant Bank, Metropolitan Life and African Bank Investments.

He was appointed to the Constitutional Court in November 2002.

Source: The Mail & Guardian A Z of South African Politics: 2004.

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.