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This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

1960. Emergency Regulations in Transkei Nos R.400 & R.413

PROCLAMATION R.400 (amended by PROCLAMATION R.413) declared a state of emergency in Transkei. They sought to "prohibit gatherings of more than ten persons without special permission, make it an offence to treat a Chief with disrespect, and permit detention-without-trial" (Dugard 1978: 92, note 198).

Moreover, they were issued "under a number of old Cape statutes which gave the State President power, equal to that of Parliament itself, to legislate in the Transkei. Regulations framed under these proclamations empower the police to detain indefinitely, for the purposes of interrogation, persons suspected of having committed any offence and prohibit access to legal advisers" (Dugard 1978: 11 Of).

The state of emergency was kept in Transkei until after 'independence' in 1976 (and perhaps even longer than that?).

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.