About this site

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

1963

Sisulu's wife Albertina is placed under banning orders (remains so until 1983)

Police raided the secret headquarters of MK, arresting the leadership. This led to the Rivonia Trial where the leaders of MK were charged with attempting to cause a violent revolution, and thus sentenced to life imprisonment.

Some ANC leaders - among them Oliver Tambo and Joe Slovo avoided arrest and left the country. Other ANC members left to undergo military training.

Fietas, Johannesburg: Harry, 'the fat man', a tramp living in Fietas disappeared. On inquiries to his family in Soweto it was found that he had died, but later it turned out that he was alive and well.

Dorothy Nyembe is arrested for leading the Natal Women's revolt where women refused to fill cattle dipping tanks, eventually destroying the tanks.

The United Arab Republic government informs the United Nations that it has banned South African ships from entering UAR ports, and that, while they will still be allowed to use the Suez Canal they will be denied all facilities there.

The Rivonia Trial opens in a special court at Pretoria. Eleven men are charged with complicity in more than 200 acts of sabotage aimed at facilitating revolution and armed invasion of South Africa. The indictment is quashed on the grounds that the State has not provided sufficient details of the alleged offences, but a new indictment is prepared and the trial proceeds.

Steve Biko was introduced to politics as a teenager, when one of his older brothers, Khaya, a student at Lovedale High School, had been arrested as a suspected Poqo member and jailed for three months.

The police regarding his brother's Pan Africanist acivities had interrogated Steve Biko, who was subsequently expelled from Lovedale.

Biko developed a strong antipathy toward white authority, and carried this attitude with him in 1964 when he entered St Francis College at Marianhill in Natal, a liberal Catholic boarding school and one of the few remaining private high schools for Africans in South Africa.

1963 - 1964

African students began focusing their attention on the multi-racial National Union of South African Students (NUSAS), an outspoken anti-government organisation with a membership drawn heavily from white English-speaking universities, for want of a vehicle to express their political aspirations. In the beginning, it seemed to be a good move as the white NUSAS leadership tended to identify strongly with black causes.

The Coloured Person's Education Act places. control over 'coloured' education under the Department of Coloured Affairs. 'Coloured' schools are also compelled to register with the government. 'Coloured' education is made compulsory.

Miriam Makeba addresses the United Nations' Special Committee Against Apartheid, in New York.

Sonia Bunting goes into exile and continues to work for the Communist Party she became organizer of the World Campaign for the Release of South African Political Prisoners.

Frances Baard is detained and held for 12 months in solitary confinement.

Dorothy Nyembe is arrested for furthering the aims of the ANC and is sentenced to three years imprisonment.

January 1963

Regime placed blanket ban on all named and banned people. ANC decided to send some leading cadres abroad to set up external mission of the ANC and reinforce the work being done by the liberation movement from abroad.

1 January 1963

Thousands of Commonwealth citizens resident in South Africa, mostly Britons, become technically aliens through failing to apply for permanent residence by 31 December 1962 under the Commonwealth Relations Act enacted on 15 June 1962.

11 January 1963

Sisulu attends a secret meeting at the house of George Xarile together with F. Van Rensburg (a shift boss from Vlakfontein mine). It is understood that Van Rensburg made bombs for Sisulu - presumably from dinamite.

18 January 1963

Parliament opens with the debate of 'no confidence' moved by the Leader of opposition Sir de Villiers Graaff. The prime Minister defends the government's Bantustan policy by attempting to establish the fact that it had been implicit in the National Party programme since it came to power in 1948.

5 February 1963

A white family is savagely killed in their caravan whilst camping on the Bashee River in the Engcobo area of the Transkei. Forty Africans are later arrested and twenty-two sentenced to death for the murders.

8 February 1963

Signs a most-favoured- Nation trade agreement with Spain.

The government publishes the draft of the Bantu Laws Amendment Bill intended to remove most of the remaining rights of Africans in white areas, including the security of employment or residence.

11 February 1963

The Defence, J.J. Fouché, announces in the House of assembly that he intends to increase the strength of the permanent army by fifty per cent.

19 February 1963

The Minister of Defence announces the re-establishment, as of 1 April 1963 of the 'Cape Corps' of coloured to be employed in non-combatant roles.

20 February 1963

Walter Sisulu attends a secret ANC meeting of the Phomolang branch.

22 February 1963

South Africa:Signs agreement with Australia on air pooling.

23 February 1963

At the annual conference of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa in Leopoldville, fifteen African states table a draft resolution requesting the United Nations Economic and Social Council to deprive of racial discrimination'. The resolution is adopted by thirty votes, with Britain, France and Spain opposing it.

27 February 1963

South Africa:Signs a treaty with the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland amending the trade agreement of 16 May 1960.

4 March 1963

Sisulu is sentenced, in the Johannesburg Regional Court, to 6 years imprisonment for (1) under section 3 (1) (A) Act 8/53 - 3 years imprisonment. Sisulu appeals, but bail is refused.

4 March 1963

Walter Sisulu, former Secretary-General of the African National Congress is convinced of having incited African workers to strike in protest against the Republic of South Africa Constitution Act of 1961, and having furthered the aims of the ANC. He is sentenced to six years' imprisonment.

9 March 1963

Sisulu is released on R6,000 bail.

14 March 1963

The Publications and Entertainment Bill, which has been before a select Committee for nearly two years, passes its third reading in the House of Assembly by six votes to forty. The Minister of interior is to appoint a Publications Control Board to control importation, distribution, exhibition, sale or possession of Publications deemed 'undesirable'

15 March 1963

The Defence Minister, J.J. Fouché, give the Senate details of South Africa's defence programme and replies to statements made by Harold Wilson on the British Labour Party's attitude to arms supplies to South Africa.

20 March 1963

Police obtain information that Sisulu is an office bearer of Umkhonto We Zizwe (Spear of the Nation).

20 March 1963

The Budget introduced by the Minister of Finance, Dr. T.E. Dönges, provides the record sum of R202 million for defence and internal security.

21 March 1963

Justice Snyman, judge in the Cape division of the Supreme Court, produces an Interim Report of his inquiry into the Paarl riots. This developed into an investigation into the Poqo organization, operating from Basutoland in collusion with subversive groups in the Transkei and its involvement in the murders and terror in the Eastern Province and the Transkei. The report is immediately tabled in the house of Assembly by the Minister of Justice B.J. Vorster, who announces that he accepts the judge's findings and will act on them.

25 March 1963

Potlako Leballo, claiming to be the leader of the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC), confirms in Maseru, Basutoland, that Poqo and the PAC are one and the same organisation and that its revolutionary council is discussing the timing and manner of an uprising to be launched in South Africa during 1963.

26 March 1963

Sisulu attends an ANC party in Dube Pokaso. The party is held in aid of strengthening ANC funds.

1 April 1963

The Foreign Officer of the Philippines announces that it has instructed its Commerce Department, the National Marketing Corporation and the Bureau of Customs, to implement a boycott of all South African goods as well as to halt exports to South Africa.

2 April 1963

First meeting of the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa (later renamed "Special Committee against Apartheid").

2 April 1963

First meeting of the Special Committee on the Policies of Apartheid of the Government of the Republic of South Africa (later renamed "Special Committee against Apartheid").

3 April 1963

Sisulu placed under 84 hours house arrest.

3 April 1963

South Africa:Signs a treaty with Great Britain on the temporary suspension of the tariff preference on crude sperm oil.

6 April 1963

South Africa:Signs a Parcel post agreement with Japan.

8 April 1963

South Africa:Signs an amendment to the constitution of the International Labour Organisation.

14 April 1963

South Africa:Signs a treaty with Bechuanaland protectorate on aeradio-tele-communications and meteorological services at Maun.

18 April 1963

The Foreign Minister states that the South African government is unable to assist the United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid since its establishment is contrary to the provisions of the United Nations.

19 April 1963

Security Police visit Sisulu's house and find that Sisulu has fled.

20 April 1963

The Rand Daily Mail reports that Sisulu has fled to Bechuanaland.

20 April 1963

South Africa:Signs the Olive Oil Agreement.

22 April 1963

The Transvaler reports that Sisulu has not yet arrived in Bechuanaland. The Star, however, alleges that he has been seen in Bechuanaland.

23 April 1963

Dr. Verwoerd, states in Parliament that if political refugees in the British Protectorates are allowed to organize revolution against South Africa then these Territories must expect retaliation.

24 April 1963

The Pretoria News alleges that Sisulu had arrived in Lorenzo Marques, Mozambique, on the 24th of April 1963 according to a press report in the L.M. Newspaper.

24 April 1963

South Africa:Signs the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations.

The Minister of Justice introduces a General Laws Amendment Bill implementing Justice Snyman's recommendations establishing emergency courts to deal with cases arising from Poqo activities, and gives the Minister power to detain anyone without trial in solitary confinement for ninety days, and thereafter for further periods of ninety days, at the Minister's discretion. The Minister is also given powers to detain without trial anyone who has been convicted of an offence endangering the security of the state. Only Helen Suzman, representing the Progressive Party, opposes the Bill in toto.

26 April 1963

At a meeting in Oslo, the Foreign Ministers of Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden and the Icelandic Ambassador call upon South Africa to change its racial policies and to cooperate with the United Nations.

30 April 1963

Walter Sisulu is in Lobatse.

30 April 1963

Algeria announces a total boycott of South Africa.

Three listed white communist serving sentences of house of arrest, escape to Bechuanaland.

May 1963

The security police begin 90-day arrests. A widespread purge of 'subversive elements' is undertaken.

1 May 1963

Prime Minister Vorster announces that Robert Sobukwe has been taken to Robben Island, where he will be detained indefinitely in terms of the General Laws Amendment Bill of 29 Apr.1963.

2 May 1963

General Law Amendment Act No 37:

Section 17, the ninety-day detention law, authorised any commissioned officer to detain - without a warrant - any person suspected of a political crime and to hold them for ninety days without access to a lawyer (Horrell 1978: 469). In practice people were often released after ninety days only to be re-detained on the same day for a further ninety-day period. The 'Sobukwe clause' allowed for a person convicted of political offences to be detained for a further twelve months. The Act also allowed for further declaration of unlawful organisations. The State President could declare any organisation or group of persons which had come into existence since 7 April 1960 to be unlawful. This enabled the government to extend to Umkhonto we Sizwe and Poqo the restrictions already in force on the ANC and the PAC (Horrell 1978: 416).

Commenced: 2 May 1963, except ss 3, 9 & 14, which came into effect at different times.

Sections 3-7 and 14-17 repealed by the Internal Security Act No 74 of 1982.

7 May 1963

South africa:Signs agreement with Portugal

8 May 1963

Exchanges notes with Scandinavia amending the Air Agreements of December 1961.

The United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid publishes its first Interim Report, recording with satisfaction the number of countries that have broken off diplomatic and commercial relations with South Africa, but noting with regret that nearly twenty member states still maintained these.

The British Ambassador in Pretoria and High Commissioner for the Protectorates, Sir John Maud, confirms that a distinction is made between ordinary political refugees and people who flee to the Protectorates to organize revolution. It is Britain's policy 'to prevent action in any territory designed to foment violence in the Republic'

16 May 1963

South Africa:Signs the Ocean Mail Contract with the Union Castle Company.

23 May 1963

South Africa:Signs additional regulations on No.2

24 May 1963

The Transkei Self-Government Bill is enacted, giving, for the first time, limited self-government to Africans in a defined area. It incorporates the draft Constitution for the Transkei, as finally approved by the Transkei Territorial Authority in December 1962.

30 May 1963

Transkei Constitution Act No 48:

Self-government given to Transkei.

Commenced: 30 May 1963

Repealed by Sch 7 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act No 200 of 1993.

5 June 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Great Britain on the release from the bound margin of preference of ten percent ad valorem on certain preserved fruit granted to South Africa.

5 June 1963

Number of alleged Poqo members arrested totalled 3,246. (House of Assembly, June 12)

25 June 1963

Signs provincial air agreement with the Federal Republic of Germany.

The final report by Justice Snyman on the Paarl Riots, is submitted to Parliament. It analyzes the main causes of the riots.

26 June 1963

Sisulu speaks on "Freedom Radio" and urges the youth to join forces and continue the struggle to fight for freedom.

27 June 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Bechuanaland Protectorate on postal services and insured parcels.

28 June - 30 June 1963

The governing body of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) meeting in Geneva, to discuss emergency measures against South Africa and the problems its membership poses. It is resolved that South Africa should be excluded from ILO meeting.

2 July 1963

Cameroon closes its sea and air ports to both Portugal and South Africa.

3 July 1963

Extension of University Education Amendment Act No 67:

Amended the 1959 Extension of University Education Act and the University College of Fort Hare Transfer Act No 64 of 1959.

Commenced: 3 July 1963

Repealed by s 21 of the Tertiary Education Act No 66 of 1988.

4 July 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Swaziland on postal services including parcel post.

11 July 1963

Sisulu is arrested and detained under Section 17 Act 37/1963.

12 July 1963

Hungary announces the breaking-off of trade relations with South Africa.

The Security Police surround a house in Rivonia and arrest eighteen people, including Walter Sisulu, former Secretary-General of the banned African National Congress and Ahmed Kathrada, who had also gone 'underground' from house arrests.

13 July 1963

The government of India announces that it is cutting India's last remaining links with South Africa by refusing landing and passage facilities to South African aircraft.

The Security police discose the existence of an underground group the Yu Chi Chan, said to include people trained in Peking and Algeria for sabotage in South Africa.

15 July 1963

Dr. Verwoerd announces that the government has decided to withdraw from the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) owing to the hostility shown by African states.

16 July 1963

Ivory Coast closes sea and airports to South Africa and Portugal.

18 July 1963

The United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid releases its second Interim Report recommending an effective an embargo on the supply of arms and ammunition, and of petroleum.

Harold Wolpe, a Johannesburg solicitor, and listed Communist, is arrested on the Bechuanaland border.

22 July 1963

Ethiopia closes her airspace to South African aircraft.

26 July 1963

The British High Commissioner for Basutoland, Bechuanaland and Swaziland issues the Prevention of Violence Abroad Proclamation, which makes it an offence for persons to conspire against, or incite, or instigate violence in South Africa or other neighbouring territories. It comes into immediate effect.

30 July 1963

In the Geneva session of the United nations Economic and Social Council, an Argentinean resolution state that South Africa shall not take part in the work of the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) until conditions for constructive co-operation have been restored by a change of its racial policy. The resolution is adopted by six votes to two, with ten abstentions.

Yugoslavia closes its consular office in Johannesburg.

31 July - 6 August 1963

The United Nations Security Council debates the South African situation. The government reaffirms its decision not to participate in the debate since discussions would concern matters falling solely within its domestic jurisdiction.

August 1963

The Christian Institute of southern Africa, a non-racial interdenominational organisation, is founded under the directorship of Rev. C. F. Beyers Naudé.

1 August - 30 September 1963

South Africa:Signs multilateral treaty for the prolongation of the International Sugar Agreement.

6 August 1963

Guinea announces that she has broken off diplomatic, commercial and cultural relations with South Africa and Portugal, and banned the entry of their nationals into Guinea.

7 August 1963

The United Nations Security Council adopts a resolution calling upon all states to cease forthwith the sale and shipment of arms, ammunition and military vehicles to South Africa.

South Africa is denied landing and over flying rights by the United Arab Republic as from this date.

7 August 1963

The Security Council adopted resolution 181 calling upon all States to cease the sale and shipment of arms, ammunition and military vehicles to South Africa.

7 August 1963

Security Council resolution...

8 August 1963

South Africa:Signs amendment to the sugar agreement of 3 June 1957 with Great Britain.

10 August 1963

Dr. K.G. Abrahams is arrested in Gobabis area of South West Africa, and subsequently charged with being the chairman of the Yu Chi Chan Club (YCCC) aimed at overthrowing the government by revolution. A precious attempt to arrest him on 19 July 1963 was obstructed by the local community at Rehoboth, SWA conflicting accounts surround the circumstances of his arrest. He himself claims to have been abducted from Bechuanaland, where he had been travelling between Ghanzi and Lobatsi.

11 August 1963

Harold Wolpe, a listed Communist arrested on the Bechuanaland border, and Arthur Goldreich, caught in the Rivonia raid escape from the Johannesburg Central Police station, 'go to ground' and on 28 August emerge in Bechuanaland.

11 August 1963

Arthur Goldreich, Harold Wolpe, Moosa Moolla and A. Jassat escaped from prison and left the country.

19 August 1963

Dr. Abrahams makes a habeas corpus application to the Cap Supreme Court and demands his return to Bechuanaland where he claims to have been already granted political asylum.

Indonesia announces the severance of diplomatic and commercial relations with South Africa, and the closure of Indonesian ports to South African vessels.

Sudan closes her sea and airports to South Africa and Portugal.

The Abrahams case is discussed by Sir Hugh Stephenson, the new British Ambassador in Pretoria and High Commissioner for Bechuanaland and the Permanent Secretary of the South African Foreign Ministry, in the light of the request by the British Colonial Office for a full report.

20 August 1963

The Israeli government informs the United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid that it has taken all necessary steps to ensure that no arms, ammunition, or strategic materials may be exported from Israel to South Africa in any form, directly or indirectly.

Mauritius closes her sea and airports to South Africa and Portugal.

22 August 1963

South African Airways (SAA) announces the re-routing of its services to Europe via Luanda (Angola), Brazzaville, the Cape Verde Islands, and Las Palmas.

28 August 1963

Goldreich and Wolpe are found to be in Francistown, Bechunaland, having flown there from Swaziland.

30 August 1963

The Prime Minister announces, in a statement before the Supreme Court in Cape Town, that Dr. Abra]iams will be returned to Bechuanaland. Dr. Abrahams, and his three companions, are returned to Ghanzi on 31 August 1963, and the charge of sabotage is withdrawn on 11 September 1963.

31 August 1963

Libya closes her sea and airports to South Africa and Portugal and denies them over flying rights.

September 1963

South African Airways is excluded from flying over the African continent, except for Portuguese territory.

3 September 1963

Dr. Verwoerd suggests that the three Protectorates might develop to independence under South Africa's guidance rather than under Britain's and offers to administer them as self-governing Bantustans.

9 September 1963

At a meeting in Stockholm the Foreign Ministers of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden confirm that their countries neither permit, nor intend to permit any exports of arms to South Africa. Their ultimate aim is the guaranteeing of equal rights to all citizens.

12 September 1963

Chad closes its air space to South Africa and Portuguese aircraft, as well as to all other planes carrying goods or passengers to or from the two countries.

14 September 1963

South Africa:Signs multilateral Convention on Offences Committed on Board Aircraft.

16 September 1963

The final report of the United Nations Special Committee on Apartheid gives a detailed review of developments in South Africa's racial policies since 6 November 1962. It is unanimously approved and published on 18 September 1963.

17 September 1963

Regulations incorporating new measures to prevent aircraft transporting 'criminals or refugees' in or out of the three British High Commission Territories are published in the Government Gazette. Thirty-seven air ports are designated as compulsory landing points (twelve for Basutoland, seventeen for Bechuanaland and eight for Swaziland).

23 September 1963

The United Arab Republic Ministry of Economy announces that all economic ties with South Africa will be severed.

At the World Health Organization's Regional Conference for Africa, in Geneva, twenty-six African delegates leave the opening session in protest against the presence of South African and Portuguese delegates. The Conference is left without a quorum and adjourned on 24 September 1963.

27 September 1963

The Danish Foreign Minister states in the United Nations General Assembly that the Scandinavian Foreign Ministers have refused an invitation by Dr. Verwoerd to visit South Africa to see for themselves what the racial situation really was. Such a journey is not seen as furthering a solution to the South African problem in accordance with the principles of the United Nations Charter.

30 September 1963

Tanganyika formally ends all imports and exports, direct and indirect, from and to South Africa.

October 1963

Prominent leaders of the ANC and allied organisations charged in the "Rivonia trial". (Many of them had been arrested on the Rivonia farm).

October - June 1963 - 1964

The Rivonia Trial, which ended in Mandela, Mbeki, Sisulu, Goldberg, Kathrada, Mhlaba, Mlangeni and Motsoaledi being sentenced to life imprisonment.

The Rivonia Trial, which ended in Mandela, Mbeki, Sisulu, Goldberg, Kathrada, Mhlaba, Mlangeni and Motsoaledi being sentenced to life.

2 October 1963

Kuwait breaks off diplomatic relations with South Africa and all Kuwaiti air and seaports are closed to South African aircraft and vessels.

9 October 1963

Walter Sisulu, Nelson Mandela, Govan Mbeki, Ahmed Kathrada, Rusty Bernstein, Dennis Goldberg, James Kantor, Andrew Mlangeni, Elias Motsoaledi and Raymond Mhlaba (The Rivonia Trialist) are charged with sabotage and attempting to overthrow the state violently.

10 October 1963

An urgent resolution is considered by the United Nations Political Committee condemning the government of South Africa for its repression, and requesting it to abandon the trial now in progress and to grant unconditional release to all political prisoners and to all persons subjected to other restrictions for having opposed the policy of apartheid. It is approved, and the following day, 11 October 1963, passed by the General Assembly by 106 votes to one.

11 October 1963

South africa:Signs multilateral sugar agreement.

11 October 1963

The General Assembly adopted resolution 1881(XVIII) requesting the Government of South Africa to abandon the "Rivonia trial" of Nelson Mandela and other leaders, and forthwith to grant unconditional release to all political prisoners and to all persons imprisoned, interned or subjected to other restrictions for having opposed the policy of apartheid. The vote was 106 to 1, with only South Africa voting against.

(This date was subsequently proclaimed the Day of Solidarity with South African Political Prisoners.)

11 October 1963

The General Assembly adopted resolution 1881(XVIII) requesting the Government of South Africa to abandon the "Rivonia trial" of Mr. Nelson Mandela and other leaders, and forthwith to grant unconditional release to all political prisoners and to all persons imprisoned, interned or subjected to other restrictions for having opposed the policy of apartheid. The vote was 106 to 1, with only South Africa voting against.

(This date was subsequently proclaimed the Day of Solidarity with South African Political Prisoners.)

15 October 1963

The Netherlands Permanent Representative at the United Nations announces that his government has banned the export and transit to South Africa of weapons and munitions which could be used for the oppression of the non-white population.

17 October 1963

The Rev. Dr. Arthur William Blaxall, an Anglican clergyman is convicted on charges of aiding the activities of the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC) and the ANC. He had pleaded guilty and does not appeal against the sentence. However, on instructions from Mr. Vorster he is released on parole the following day.

21 October 1963

The Canadian Minister for External Affairs announces that the government has imposed an embargo on further sales or shipments of Canadian military equipment to South Africa.

28 October 1963

The United Nations General Assembly Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Committee approves a Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in which South Africa's policy of apartheid is specifically condemned.

November 1963

The Minister of Security announces that 543 people have been detained under the 90-day clause. Of these 151 have been released, 275 have been charged in court, sixty-one are due to be charged shortly, five have escaped and fifty-one are still being questioned.

7 November 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Great Britain on the suspension of the margin of preference on crude sperm oil.

8 November 1963

South Africa:Signs multilateral agreement on radio regulations.

13 November 1963

South Africa:Signs multilateral treaty on the provisional accession of Yugoslavia to the General Agreement on Tarrifs and Trade.

16 November 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty extending the declaration on the provisional accession of Argentina to the General Agreement on Tarrifs and Trade.

18 November 1963

Eric H. Louw, Foreign Minister since January 1955, announces his intention to retire.

20 November 1963

The first elections to the forty-five seats for elected members of the Transkei Legislative Assembly take place.There are no political parties, the choice being between candidates supporting Chief Kaiser Matanzima and those supporting Paramount Chief Victor Polo Ndamase of the West Pondos, believed to favour multi-racialism. All adults are entitled to vote; voters comprise all Xhosa,not only in the Transkei, but throughout South Africa.

21 November 1963

It is officially announced on Eric Louw's seventy-third birthday that the South African Ambassador in London, Dr. Hilgard Muller, will be sworn in as Foreign Minister on 9 January 1964.

22 November 1963

South Africa:Signs multilateral treaty banning nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere.

28 November 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Great Britain on the temporary suspension of the tariff preference on crude sperm oil enjoyed by South Africa,

December 1963

Transkei granted self-government. In elections held earlier, opponents of bantustan policy won a majority of the 45 elected seats. But they were outnumbered by 64 appointed Chiefs who became members of the assembly.

Zainab Asvat leads a women's march to Union Buildings to protest appointment of Indian National Council and Group Areas Act.

2 December 1963

It is officially conceded that the majority of the members elected to the first Transkei Legislative Assembly support Chief Poto. The voting percentage in most areas is reported to be over 70% and the total number of voters to have exceeded 800,000.

3 December 1963

The Rivonia Trial, concerning two charges of sabotage, one under the Suppression of Communism Act, and one under the General Law Amendment Act, begins before Justice de Wet. The Prosecutor, Dr. Percy Yutar gives details of explosives to be used to commit acts of destruction, to be followed by guerrilla activity and military invasion.

4 December 1963

The United Nations Security Council unanimously adopts a resolution calling on the South African government to cease its repressive measures and calls on all states to embargo materials for arms manufacture. A small group of recognized experts is to be established to examine methods of resolving the South African situation.

4 December 1963

The Security Council, in resolution 182(1963) called upon all States "to cease forthwith the sale and shipment of equipment and materials for the manufacture and maintenance of arms and ammunition in South Africa". It requested the Secretary-General to establish a small group of experts to examine methods of resolving the situation in South Africa "through full, peaceful and orderly application of human rights and fundamental freedoms to all inhabitants of the territory as a whole, regardless of race, colour or creed, and to consider what part the United Nations might play in the achievement of this goal."

4 December 1963

The Security Council, in resolution 182(1963) called upon all States "to cease forthwith the sale and shipment of equipment and materials for the manufacture and maintenance of arms and ammunition in South Africa". It requested the Secretary-General to establish a small group of experts to examine methods of resolving the situation in South Africa "through full, peaceful and orderly application of human rights and fundamental freedoms to all inhabitants of the territory as a whole, regardless of race, colour or creed, and to consider what part the United Nations might play in the achievement of this goal."

6 December 1963

The Transkei Legislative Assembly meets for the first time in Umtata and elects Chief Kaiser Matanzima as Chief Minister by fifty-four votes to forty-nine for Chief Victor Polo, with two papers spoilt. Chief Matanzima forms a political party with the backing of the non-elective chiefs and their supporters; Chief Poto goes into opposition as the leader of the democratically elected members.

10 December 1963

South africa:Signs multilateral treaty on consent to marriage, minimum age for marriage and registration of marriages.

11 December 1963

The first of the 'Bantustans' comes into existence when the Minister of Bantu Administration and Development, de Wet Net, opens the Transkei Legislative Assembly at Umtata. Chief Kaiser Matanzima is installed as Chief Minister.

12 December 1963

South Africa:Accepts Procès-verbal extending the provisional accession of Tunisa to the General Agreement on Tarrifs and Trade.

15 December 1963

Sisulu's appeal is dismissed by the Transvaal section of the Supreme Court. Sisulu must serve his 6 year prison sentence.

16 December 1963

The General Assembly appealed for assistance to families of persons persecuted by the South African Government for their opposition to apartheid. [Resolution 1978(XVIII)]

23 December 1963

South Africa:Signs treaty with Southern Rhodesia on the removal of the operation of the 6 Feb. 1964 trade agreement of 16 May 1960.

South Africa:Signs treaty with Southern Rhodesia on the continuation of the extradition agreement of 19 November 1962.

South Afrca:Signs treaty on extradition (Northern Rhodesia) with Great Britain.

It is announced in Pretoria that Dr. Card de Wet, M.P. for Vanderbijlpark, Transvaal and grandson of General IC. de Wet, a leading Boer commander in the South African War of 1899-1902, has been appointed Ambassador to the United Kingdom.

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.