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This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. It is the product of almost two decades of research and includes analyses, chronologies, historical documents, and interviews from the apartheid and post-apartheid eras.

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1956. Industrial Conciliation Amendment Act No 28

Riley (1991: 52) refers to this as the INDUSTRIAL COALITION ACT. This "provided that no further 'mixed' unions would be allowed to register and sought to impose racially separate branches and all-white executive committees on existing 'mixed' unions which refused to split. It prohibited all workers, black and white, from striking in 'essential industries' and banned unions from political affiliations. Clause 77 gave legal backing to the reservation of skilled jobs to white workers, as the NATIVE BUILDING WORKERS ACT of 1951 had already done for white workers in the building trade, 'to ensure that they will not be exploited by the lower standard of living of any other race' " (Fine & Davis 1990: 157).

Further amendments appeared in 1959 and 1979.

This resource is hosted by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory, but was compiled and authored by Padraig O’Malley. Return to the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory site.